2012 Schedule

9:00 am Breakfast (with special session for alumni)»

10:00 am Keynote Address - Cook Auditorium»

11:00 am • First Set of Panels
Faith and Business: Why Be Honest? (Stoneman Classroom)»
Faith and Medicine: The Modern Priesthood? (General Motors Classroom)»
Faith and Global Development: When Does Helping Hurt? (Rosenwald Classroom)»
Faith and Vocational Ministry (Frantz Classroom)»
Faith and Law: Do Justice, Love Mercy (Barclay Classroom)»

12:00 pm • Second Set of Panels
Faith and Government (Stoneman Classroom)»
Religion and Science: Is There a Conflict? (General Motors Classroom)»
Faith and Public Health (Rosenwald Classroom)»
Faith and the Environment (Frantz Classroom)»

1:00 pm Lunch (PepsiCo Dining Room)»

2:15 pm Fireside Chat: Beyond Regrets (Stell Hall)»

3:10 pm • Third Set of Panels
Faith and Politics (Stoneman Classroom)»
Faith at the End of Life: Starting Out With the End in Mind (General Motors Classroom)»
Faith and Athletics: Lessons from the Playing Field (Frantz Classroom)»
Alumni Internship Presentations (Rosenwald Classroom)»

4:00 pm Networking Mixer (Stell Hall)»

after 5:00 pm Alumni Reunions (off-campus)»

Breakfast (PepsiCo Dining Room, Byrne Hall): All conference attendees are invited to join us for a breakfast buffet in Byrne Hall, Tuck School of Business. Use this time to meet fellow attendees, students, and panelists.

Presentation for alumni (Executive Dining Room, adjacent to PepsiCo Dining Room): All alumni participants and attendees are encouraged to attend a special presentation by EWS Board members Jonathan Crane ’71 and Gregory Slayton ’81. They will share the goals and activities of EWS and will discuss how alumni can be involved.

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The keynote address will feature presentations by Provost Carol Folt and Frank Young, MD PhD, former Commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration.Powered by Hackadelic Sliding Notes 1.6.5

In his first published work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), social philosopher Adam Smith argues that economic self-interest, expressed within supportive social structures, motivates moral behavior. However, what happens when business culture is not so consistently supportive? In their 1990 article, “Why Be Honest If Honesty Doesn’t Pay,” Bhide and Stevenson argue: “Treachery, we found, can pay. There is no compelling economic reason to tell the truth or keep one’s word — punishment for the treacherous in the real world is neither swift nor sure.” If this is true, why be honest? In this panel we will examine how faith informs one’s definition of success in business and one’s motives for honesty.

Moderator:
Erika Santos TU’12, second year student, Tuck School of Business
Panelists:
Hans Helmerich D’81, Chairman and CEO, Helmerich & Payne, Inc.
Chris Goulard D’89, Pastor of Stewardship, Saddleback Church, CA
Jonathan Crane D’71, Former Executive Vice President, MCI Inc.

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At medical schools across the country students mark their passage from preclinical to clinical health science by donning a white coat in a ceremony of almost religious significance. The now-standard White Coat Ceremony – introduced to medical schools in the early 1990s – symbolizes a medical student’s conversion from a layperson to a member of the healthcare profession, not unlike a priest’s ordination to priesthood. Since its introduction, many people have pointed to the ceremony as evidence of the modern world’s veneration of medicine and healthcare, and of doctors as the new priests of well-being. Is the spirit of modernity a worship of health and medicine? When is the boundary crossed between emphasis and idolatry? In this panel, Christian doctors will reflect on the role of medicine and the doctor and share how their faith influences their practice of medicine.

Moderator:
Gregg Fairbrothers D’76, Founder and Director, Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network
Panelists:
Frank Young, MD PhD, Former Commissioner of the FDA
Albert G. Mulley, Jr., MD MPP D’70, Director, Dartmouth Center for Healthcare Delivery Science

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We frequently hear of suffering in the developing world, from famine to earthquakes to the AIDS epidemic. Many organizations, both faith-based and secular, exist to address these problems. However, some have called into question the effectiveness of some of these development and aid programs. As we attempt to solve the issues we see is it possible to create even larger problems? As Dr. John Perkins writes, “by focusing on symptoms [of poverty] rather than on the underlying disease, we are often hurting the very people we are trying to help… as followers of Jesus Christ, we simply must do better.” What, then, should a Christian do to understand the causes of poverty and fulfill Christ’s calling to aid the poor? In this panel, alumni with experience in international aid and development will consider these questions and share a vision for work that honors Christ and helps those most in need.

Moderator:
Rev. Richard Crocker, Dean of the Tucker Foundation and Dartmouth College Chaplain
Panelists:
Kadita “A.T.” Tshibaka, D’70 TU’71, Former CEO, Opportunity International
Joyce A. Sackey, MD D’85 DMS’89, Founder, Foundation for African Relief; Dean of Multicultural Affairs and Global Health, Tufts School of Medicine

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In today’s academy there is little guidance or preparation for students who are considering a vocation in ministry. Perhaps this is in part because of the assumed dichotomy between faith and learning, religious devotion and elite education. History tells us, however, that this dichotomy is a recent development in the academic vision. Dartmouth’s own history attests to the belief that faith and learning can and ought to go together, that ministry is a vocation that draws deeply upon the resources of intellectual life. What are the unique challenges and advantages of entering vocation in ministry after the preparation of a Dartmouth education? What is the role of education for the minister and his or her congregation?

Moderator:
Ryan Bouton D’01, CCC Staff Team Leader, Dartmouth College
Panelists:
Sister Louise Marie, SsEW, Director, Casa Maria Retreat House
Rev. Robert V. Mucci D’79, Vice-Chancellor, Diocese of Brooklyn
Susan Conroy D’87, Author and Television Host
Craig Morton D’89, Pastor, Wellspring Worship Center

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Christian teaching values both justice and mercy as central virtues in civic life. Followers of Jesus are exhorted to practice both virtues in their relationships with others. However, when it comes to participating in the legal system, some would argue that this exhortation presents a quandary. If extending mercy requires lessening the punishment, how are the demands of justice satisfied? Likewise, it would seem that striving for perfect justice undermines the command to love mercy. In a society that increasingly turns to its courts for moral prescriptions, how can we recapture a vision of doing justice and loving mercy that meets the demands of our present day?

Moderator:
Peter Blair D’12, Former Editor-in-Chief, Dartmouth Apologia
Panelists:
Roy S. McCandless D’84, Attorney, Concord, NH
Thomas A. Barnico D’77, Lecturer, Boston College Law School; Former Assistant Attorney General, Massachusetts
Noel J. Augustyn D’68, Assistant Director, Administrative Office of the United States Courts

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Decisions made at the highest levels of government affect the livelihoods of millions. Complex problems call for policy solutions that are well informed, moral, and humane. National emergencies call for responses that are immediate and effective. Amid the pressure of high-stakes decision making on Capitol Hill, what role does faith play? How does Christianity motivate and inform a life of public service? In this session we will hear from panelists whose faith has shaped their response to difficult policy decisions at home and abroad.

Moderator:
Emily Esfahani Smith D’09, Associate Editor, The New Criterion
Panelists:
Louis Tucker D’95, CEO, Mission Sync LLC; Navy SEAL Commander, Reserves
Frank Young, MD PhD, Former Commissioner of the FDA

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Writing in 1609, Johannes Kepler – one of the first men to present scientific proofs for the Copernican cosmological model – exhorted the student of astronomy, “I urge my reader… Let him join with me in praising and celebrating the wisdom and greatness of the Creator, which I disclose to him from the deeper explanations of the form of the universe.”1 The connection Kepler draws between praising God and explaining the universe, that is, between religious devotion and scientific inquiry, seems out of place in our contemporary discourse. Indeed, modernity usually assumes an antagonistic relationship between the two. This supposed conflict of science and faith is actually a recent development. In this panel, we will examine the origins of this conflict, focusing in particular on the 19th century historians John William Draper and Andrew Dickson White, and the myths that arose from their work. We will use this understanding of history to explore the intimate relationship of science and faith.

Interviewer:
Andrew Schuman D’10, Founding Editor-in-Chief, The Dartmouth Apologia
Guest:
Lawrence M. Principe, PhD, Drew Professor of the Humanities, Johns Hopkins University

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Complex and urgent public health needs beset our healthcare systems at home and abroad. In the face of gross inequalities and sweeping epidemics like HIV/AIDS, few would argue that our healthcare systems should be left unaddressed. Yet, the questions of what this healthcare system should look like, how to achieve it, and who should be designing and implementing it, are topics of hot debate. What should healthcare look like in 21st century? What role should countries like America play in addressing the epidemics that devastate the developing world? Drawing from the resources of a Christian perspective, panelists will discuss guiding principles that should guide us as we move forward.

Moderator:
Caitlin Reiner D’06, Global PMTCT Program Manager, Clinton Health Access Initiative
Panelists:
J. Robert Beck, MD D’74, Chief Academic and Medical Officer, Fox Chase Cancer Center
Timothy Flanigan, MD D’79, Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island and The Miriam Hospitals
Joyce A. Sackey, MD D’85 DMS ’89, Founder, Foundation for African Relief; Dean of Multicultural Affairs and Global Health, Tufts School of Medicine

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Some have called environmentalism the ‘new religion’ of our age. Debates over global warming, clean energy, and conservation certainly receive much attention in our society. With more than 7 billion people sharing our planet, it is obvious that our actions have environmental consequences. The Bible tells us that God gave man dominion over the earth and everything living on it. Does this mean we are to be guardians, conquerors, or something else entirely? How should we view the world around us, and how should we interact with it? This panel will examine current environmental issues and consider how a Christian worldview influences environmental stewardship.

Moderator:
George Thorman D’11, Environmental Studies Department, Dartmouth College
Panelists:
John Copeland Nagle, John N. Matthews Professor, The Law School, University of Notre Dame
Stephen Blackmer D’79, Green Friar/Kairos Earth

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All Conference attendees are invited to join us for a plated lunch in PepsiCo Dining Room. We encourage you to use this time to form relationships with panelists, alumni, and students.
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In his recent study of the lives of 18-23 year olds, sociologist Christian Smith notes: “Most emerging adults simply do not want to see themselves as having regrets, even though they also get angry with themselves about mistakes and continue sometimes to be haunted by problems from the past.” (p. 152) How should we understand our failures and regrets? Is there a way forward that avoids enduring self-resentment on the one hand and carefree self-deception on the other? In this fireside chat, alumni will discuss how they have come to understand their regrets through the eyes of faith.

Moderators:
Catalina Gorla D’09, International Financial Markets
Gregg Fairbrothers D’76, Founder and Director, Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network
Panelists:
Chris Goulard D’89, Pastor of Stewardship, Saddleback Church
Jeff Kemp D’81, Former NFL Quarterback; President, Stronger Families

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Religion has always played an important role in the lives of Americans. For many people it guides their moral judgments, civic responsibilities, and political positions. It is not surprising, then, that faith plays a role in the careers of many political candidates. But how much of a difference does faith really make in politics? Should we consider a candidate’s religion when voting? For politicians, how does one reconcile the interests of the public with personal faith commitments?

Moderator:
Gregory W. Slayton, D’81, author, diplomat, professor, businessman
Panelists:
Matt Dunne, Head of Community Affairs, Google, Inc.
Kevin H. Smith, 2012 Candidate for NH Governor
Ingrid Gustavson Hill D’82, History Teacher, Boston Trinity Academy

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In modern American society, we have become adept at avoiding the reality of death. We send our elderly to nursing homes and our sick to hospitals, quarantined from the communities in which they once lived. Nevertheless, death is a reality that we all must face; we must also address the questions, doubts, and sometimes hopes that come with it. What, then, does it look like to die well? What is most important to people who are dying? How do questions of faith influence the final days of one’s life?

Moderator:
Ralph W. Aye, MD D’72, Former Chief of Surgery, Swedish Medical Center
Panelists:
Robert W. Lobel, MD D’83, Urogynecology/Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery
Michael Claessens, MD D’85, Chairman, Department of Palliative Medicine, Marshfield Clinic
Frank Young, MD PhD, Former Commissioner of the FDA

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The Bible often uses athletic imagery to convey spiritual truth. When discussing self-control, for instance, the Apostle Paul writes “In a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize. Run in such a way as to get the prize.” There are more examples in Scripture and more apt illustrations that can be drawn from personal experience. In this session, former NFL quarterback Jeff Kemp ‘81 will reflect upon 12 years of experience in professional football and discuss the lessons he learned along the way.

Interviewer:
C. William Pollock, D’72, Chairman and CEO, NIP, Inc.
Guest:
Jeff Kemp D’81, Former NFL Quarterback; President, Stronger Families

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In this session, several alumni will share about internship projects they are hosting for Dartmouth students. Both alumni and students are encouraged to attend to learn more about opportunities for involvement.

Moderator:
Bethany Mills D’10
Presenters:
Marian Noronha, Founder and CEO, Turbocam International; Abolition Activist in Nepal
Caitlin Reiner D’06, Lwala Community Hospital, Lwala Kenya
David Allman D’76, Opportunity International; Micro-finance in Nicaragua

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All Conference attendees are invited to join us for refreshments and a time of networking.
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Several Dartmouth ministries – Aquinas House, Dartmouth Area Christian Fellowship, and Christian Impact – will be hosting reunions for their alumni. Click here for more details, and please RSVP on the conference registration form.
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