2014 Schedule

8:30 am Breakfast»

10:00 am Keynote Address - Cook Auditorium»

11:00 am • First Set of Panels
Pursuing Peace After Conflict: The Demands of Forgiveness and Justice (Stoneman Classroom)»
Business and Leadership: How to Prepare to Make Tough Choices (General Motors Classroom)»
The Essence of Being Human: Does contemporary psychology complement faith? (Rosenwald Classroom)»
It's the Law (Barclay Classroom)»

12:00 pm • Second Set of Panels
What is leaving well? (Stoneman Classroom)»
Can business be a mission? (General Motors Classroom)»
Medicine and International Development (Frantz Classroom)»

1:00 pm Lunch (PepsiCo Dining Room)»

2:00 pm X.ado Student Acapella Performance (Stell Hall)»

2:30 pm • Third Set of Panels
Is there a role for faith in the university? (Stoneman Classroom)»
Faith has a longstanding roll in Living Well. Is there a role for Thinking Well? (General Motors Classroom)»
A Design Supreme: Redemption as a Decision-Making Force in Engineering (Frantz Classroom)»
Faith and International Development (Rosenwald Classroom)»

3:30 pm Networking Mixer (Stell Hall)»

after 5:00 pm Alumni Reunions (off-campus)»

Breakfast (PepsiCo Dining Room, Byrne Hall): All conference attendees are invited to join us for a breakfast buffet in Byrne Hall, Tuck School of Business.  Special student and alumni breakfast will also be arranged. Use this time to meet fellow attendees, students, and panelists. Powered by Hackadelic Sliding Notes 1.6.5
The keynote address will feature Gary Haugen the president of the International Justice Mission.Powered by Hackadelic Sliding Notes 1.6.5

Bringing reconciliation to embittered post-conflict communities is one of the greatest needs, and most difficult problems, facing our world today. The wars and genocides of the 20th century have left many communities scared with the memory of recent atrocities and longing for justice, while other communities hope for impunity and a respite from guilt. For Christians, the dual demands of forgiveness and justice motivate the pursuit of peace and reconciliation, but not without tension. In his award-winning book Exclusion and Embrace, Miroslav Volf articulates the Christian dilemma this way: “How does one remain loyal both to the demand of the oppressed for justice and to the gift of forgiveness that the Crucified offered to the perpetrators?” In this panel, Miroslav Volf and Gary Haugen will draw upon their experiences in post-conflict communities – Dr. Volf in Croatia and Mr. Haugen in South Africa and Rwanda – to explore answers to this question.

Moderator:
Ryan McAnnally-Linz D’06, currently pursuing a PhD at Yale University
Panelists:
Miroslav Volf, Professor of Theology at Yale Divity School, Founder and Director, Yale Center for Faith and Culture
Gary Haugen, International Justice Mission, President

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Leaders in the business world face constant choices, some of which are conscious and others that might not be evident until after a decision has been made. Regardless, we entrust our leaders with the responsibility to make the right choices. This panel will center upon a core question: how do we prepare for the choices we will encounter in life? Using their experiences as business leaders, panelists will consider how we make good choices or determine what the right choice is. How might our faith guide the choices we make in our studies, our vocations, and our personal lives?

Moderator:
Gregg Fairbrothers D’76, Founder and Director, Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network
Panelists: 
Hans Helmerich D’81, Former Chairman and CEO, Helmerich & Payne, Inc.
Scott Stephenson, CEO and President, Verisk Analytics
Lee Torrence, President, CWB Enterprises

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For two millennia the Christian faith has wrestled with the deepest questions of human existence, meaning and hope. How does Christianity’s treatment of these questions interface with the perspectives and assumptions of contemporary psychology? Where does contemporary psychology complement Christian faith? Where does it undercut faith? More broadly, what does fruitful dialogue between the Christian worldview and psychology look and feel like? As Christians, we must think wisely about how to care for the deepest problems we face in living and this requires a careful engagement with the resources, insights and worldviews of our neighbors in the field of psychology.

Moderator:
Don Willeman, Pastor, Christ Redeemer Church
Panelists: 
Alasdair Groves D’04, President, CCEF New England
Rich Lopez, Dartmouth Graduate Student
Dr. Robert Humphries, Retired Psychiatrist, 35 years

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Our legal system is an example of the profound role choices play in society. Lawmakers are tasked with deciding what is permitted and what is not, what standards we should uphold and strive for. Many of our individual choices are then measured by these laws: what if I decide to drive over the speed limit or to cheat on my tax return? Clearly, we need to know about making good choices. How do those in the legal profession – whether lawmakers, lawyers, or judges – view choices? Is it necessary to have a system of beliefs or values to guide our choices? What responsibilities does this place on us?

Interviewer:
Charlie Clark, D’11, Chairman, Fare Forward
Guest: 
Stephen Smith, D’88, Professor, Notre Dame Law School

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Upon his retirement as the CEO of one of the largest and most successful drilling companies in the world, Hans Helmerich D’80 wrote in a letter to his employees, “Years ago, someone shared how important it is in certain situations and seasons of life to leave well.  It means to leave something better than you found it, to leave in a timely fashion… and to hand off the responsibility to another’s capable or even more qualified hands.”

There is a time and season for everything. How do we learn how to leave when that time is come, and perhaps more importantly, how to leave well? Leaving one thing necessarily means beginning something else.  All of us eventually confront these moments, but we rarely think enough about them in advance to do them well.

In our panel we will talk about some of the spiritual and theological dimensions of this most important idea with three people who have pondered these questions as they left.  The faith heroes in the Book of Hebrews became heroes because they left something they knew, and went—even though they didn’t know where they were going (11:8).  But in a secular and pressured society, how do we learn to leave things at all? How do we acknowledge the need for even more capable hands than ours? Too often this important question, this challenge to our reason, faith, and vocation, is ignored until it’s too late. In many ways all of life is a triangulation toward one or more leavings well, and often it’s only after leaving one thing well that we can begin another thing well again.

Moderator: 
Catalina Gorla, D’09, Program Manager, Health Care Innovations at Dartmouth
Panelists: 
Hans Helmerich, D’81, Former Chairman and CEO, Helmerich & Payne, Inc.
Andrew Schuman, D’10, Founding Editor-in-Chief, Apologia
Gregg Fairbrothers,D’76, Founder and Director, Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network

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Business as missions is the integration of for-profit business and entrepreneurship initiatives with a mission to share the Gospel around the world.  Business development leverages for-profit endeavors to address spiritual, social, economic, and environmental needs.  Business as missions provides a platform for dignified work and vocation, providing essential resources and transferable skill training into poor or marginalized communities.  In turn employees can model biblical principles and ethics.  This panel will address the question how can we practically implement business as missions initiatives?  How can Christians live out business as missions in any work environment both at home and abroad?

Moderator:
Vincent Mack, Program Officer, Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy
Panelists:
Jim Bullion, D’78, TU’82, Director, US Department of Defense’s Task Force for Business and Stability Operations, Founder, Phoenix Global Services LLC, Former Vice President, Corporate Development at Genuity
David Stone, D’79, Founder and CEO, First Rate, Inc.
Luanne Zurlo, D’78, Founder and Co-Chair, Worldfund

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The state of healthcare in the developing world demands attention.  In light of crises like the HIV/AIDS pandemic, many consider global health one of the most important issues of our day.  Yet, there is much debate over what an improved healthcare system should look like, how to achieve it, and who should design and implement it.  What is the goal of global healthcare in the 21st century? Is healthcare a human right, or a privilege for those who can access and afford it? Further, how do faith commitments come into play – for healthcare itself, for those implementing and providing it, and for those who need it most? What role should countries like America play in addressing the epidemics that devastate the developing world? Drawing from the resources of a Christian perspective, the panel will discuss perspectives on the way forward.

Interviewer:
Heidi McAnnally-Linz, Manager, Communications and Development at Innovations for Poverty Action
Guests:
Fred Ochieng MD, D’05, Co-Founder, Lwala Community Alliance

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All Conference attendees are invited to join us for a plated lunch in PepsiCo Dining Room or more informally there will be Boloco burritos near the classrooms. We encourage you to use this time to form relationships with panelists, alumni, and students.
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X.ado is a co-ed Christian a cappella group from Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH.  We sing to the glory of God and joyfully proclaim the good news of Christ through our music!

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  During the past several years a spate of popular books penned by some of America’s most influential professors – from Harvard’s Harry Lewis, to Yale’s Anthony Kronman, to Chicago’s Martha Nussbaum – announce a crisis at the core of American higher education. What was once the main goal of a university education – discernment of a life well lived – has all but disappeared from it, leaving students increasingly ill equipped to live lives of meaning and purpose. In this panel, we will examine the nature of the proposed crisis and explore how Christian faith motivates us to respond.

Moderator:
Andrew Schuman D’12, Founder, The Dartmouth Apologia
Panelists:
Miroslav Volf, Henry B. Wright Professor of Theology, Yale Divinity School, Founder and Director, Yale Center for Faith and Culture
Randall Balmer, Chair, Department of Religion at Dartmouth College

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Last year, some of the founders of Apologia, the Wheelock Society, and Fare Forward met with ministry staff from North Point Community Church, one of the largest and most influential churches in the country. At one point in the conversation, a North Point staff member said, “We are doing a pretty good job helping people live well in their faith, but we have no idea how to help them think well in their faith.”
In our secular and anxious society, living well and thinking well are two of the greatest challenges young adults face as they transition from university life to the early career stage. When our panelists created Apologia, the Wheelock Society, and Fare Forward, they cast a vision for Christian faith as “a foundation for all of life and thought”. In this panel they discuss how they are trying to meet this challenge and collaborating with people on campuses, in churches, and in the private sector to find new ways to help young adults learn to live well and think well in their faith.

Moderator: 
Charlie Clark, D’11, Chairman, Fare Forward
Panelists: 
Peter Blair, D’12, Editor-in-Chief, Fare Forward
Charlie Dunn, D’10, Pastoral Resident, Highland Park Presbyterian Church
Brendan Woods, D’13, Analyst, Investment Banking

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Engineering is the creative application of scientific first principles in the design of products and processes for the betterment of society.  From academic research to product development, the engineering design process is replete with decisions that can impact entire populations around the globe today.  How does an understanding of God’s story rightly impact an engineer’s core tasks?  Is faith simply a moral additive to otherwise pragmatic decisions?  What are the costs of separating faith and work in a vocation that reflects the scientifically creative work of God himself?  Prof. Doug Lauffenberger and Drew Matter will discuss how a deeper understanding of redemption can positively impact the decisions and core vocational calling of an engineer.

Interviewer: 
Drew Matter, Lead Manufacturing Engineer, FreshAir Sensor Corporation
Guest: 
Doug Lauffenberger, Ford Professor of Bioengineering, MIT

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  We frequently hear of suffering in the developing world, from famine to earthquakes to the AIDS epidemic. Many organizations, both faith-based and secular, exist to address these problems, and billions of dollars have been invested.  While these efforts have improved millions of lives, they have often left the systemic causes that underlie global poverty untouched. In recent years microfinance has emerged as a leading approach to address these underlying economic and human needs by supply aspiring entrepreneurs with the capital, know-how, and accountability they need to provide for themselves and contribute to the wealth of their society. Microfinance, however, is not without its challenges.  As Dr. John Perkins writes, “by focusing on symptoms [of poverty] rather than on the underlying disease, we are often hurting the very people we are trying to help… as followers of Jesus Christ, we simply must do better.” What, then, should a Christian do to understand the causes of poverty and fulfill Christ’s calling to aid the poor? In this panel, Dartmouth alumni will discuss their extensive careers in business and explain their burgeoning passion for the role of microfinance within a holistic approach to development.

Moderator:
Thabo Matse, D’14, Economics Major, Dartmouth College
Presenters: 
David Allman, D’76, Opportunity International; Micro-finance in Nicaragua
Beth Johnston Stephenson, D’82, Chair, Opportunity Transformation Investments, Inc.
Kadita “A.T.” Tshibaka, D’70 TU’71, Former CEO, Opportunity International

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All Conference attendees are invited to join us for refreshments and a time of networking.
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Several Dartmouth ministries –  including the Dartmouth Area Christian Fellowship – will be hosting reunions for their alumni. Please RSVP on the conference registration form.
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